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  • Upper Mississippi River System Hydraulic Model Update Complete

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island, St. Paul and St. Louis Districts recently completed a seven-year effort to develop an updated, standardized hydraulic model for the Upper Mississippi River System, including the Illinois Waterway. The model can be used to evaluate and communicate the effects of floodplain modifications to provide better predictability and more consistent flood risk management for the Upper Mississippi River System.
  • Upper Mississippi River System Hydraulic Model Update Complete

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Rock Island, St. Paul and St. Louis Districts recently completed a seven-year effort to develop an updated, standardized hydraulic model for the Upper Mississippi River System, including the Illinois Waterway. The model can be used to evaluate and communicate the effects of floodplain modifications to provide better predictability and more consistent flood risk management for the Upper Mississippi River System.
  • Corps of Engineers activates Emergency Operations Center

    St. Louis District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, activated its Emergency Operations Center as part of its continued readiness posture and response to rising forecasted river stages. The EOC will operate seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • St. Louis Corps of Engineers activates Emergency Operations Center

    Flood preparations are taking center stage in the St. Louis District. Col. Bryan K. Sizemore, St. Louis District commander, activated the Emergency Operations Center today to prepare for forecasted river stages. The EOC will operate 7 days a week from 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
  • There’s something for everyone at the Great Rivers Festival

    This Father’s Day, bring Dad down to the Mississippi River! The third annual Great Rivers Festival will be at the National Great Rivers Museum in Alton, IL on Saturday June 18th from 12 pm – 7 pm. You can look forward to live music from Whiskey Drive, local food and drink vendors, local art vendors, and much more! There will be live bird shows from the TreeHouse Wildlife Center and an appearance by Serengeti Steve: The Reptile Experience. Other attractions include archery, catch-and-release trout fishing, birdhouse building, sand and chalk art, and lessons on how to catch and prepare Asian carp!
  • Corps of Engineers closes locks due to high water

    Due to high water, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St. Louis District closed Mississippi River Locks 24 in Clarksville and 25 in Winfield, as well as Jerry F. Costello Lock and Dam on the Kaskaskia River.
  • Corps of Engineers holds public workshop on water control

    Carlyle Lake will hold a public workshop Monday night to provide updated information on water control operations at the lake.
  • Lock and Dam and Recreational Facilities Closing

    Current flooding conditions on the Kaskaskia River are causing the closure of the Corps operated Day Use and Camping areas. The maximum regulated pool elevation is 368.8, in reference to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD), and currently the Kaskaskia River is at 376.50 NGVD. Once the Kaskaskia River has reached the critical elevation of 380.5 the Lock and Dam will also close. Predictions currently forecast a crest of 381.5 feet NGVD and 35.4 feet at Chester on the Mississippi River on June 20th. Once the Mississippi River has crested and there is no more significant precipitation the river levels will fall. The facilities located at the Kaskaskia River Project will reopen as soon as flood water recedes and cleanup is finished.
  • Regular dialogue with the navigation industry continues to keep commerce moving on the Mississippi River system

    Near constant communication between the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the navigation industry and the U.S. Coast Guard is allowing commercial barge traffic to safely pass a restricted section of the lower Mississippi River (miles 632–635) near Fair Landing, Ark., and 30 miles south of Helena, Ark., with most delays less than 10 hours.