US Army Corps of Engineers
St. Louis District

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Category: 2019 Flood Fight
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  • Carlyle Lake Pool Update, 6-28-19

    As of 12:00 p.m. on Friday, June 28, 2019 the pool elevation at Carlyle Lake was 452.55 feet, referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). The current release rate is approximately 5,200 cubic feet per second (cfs). The inflow for Thursday, June 27, 2019 was approximately 13,080 day second feet (dsf). With current precipitation on the ground, Carlyle Lake is forecasted to crest at less than 453.0 feet NGVD on Saturday, June 29, 2019. Carlyle Lake Dam is operating as designed, helping reduce flood stages on the Lower Kaskaskia and Mississippi Rivers. 
  • Carlyle Lake Pool Update, 6-27-19

    As of 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, June 27, 2019 the pool elevation at Carlyle Lake was 452.10 feet, referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). The current release rate is approximately 4,950 cubic feet per second (cfs). The inflow for Wednesday, June 26, 2019 was approximately 12,730 day second feet (dsf). With current precipitation on the ground, Carlyle Lake is forecasted to crest at 452.5 feet NGVD on Thursday, June 27, 2019 in the afternoon. Carlyle Lake Dam is operating as designed, helping reduce flood stages on the Lower Kaskaskia and Mississippi Rivers.
  • High Water Continues at Lake Shelbyville

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Lake Shelbyville is reporting continued high water conditions at the lake. The pool elevation has risen to 10.32 feet above normal summer pool (599.7 feet referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). The level on Tuesday, June 25 was 610.02 feet NVGD.  The discharge rate was 1750 cubic feet per second (cfs) and the inflow was 4170 cfs.
  • High Water at Lake Shelbyville

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Lake Shelbyville is reporting high water conditions at the lake. The pool elevation has risen to 6.39 feet above normal summer pool (599.7 feet referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). The level as of 7 a.m. on Thursday, June 20 was 606.09 feet NVGD and rising.  The discharge rate was 750 cubic feet per second (cfs).
  • Mark Twain Lake Announces Excess Debris on the Lake

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at Mark Twain Lake announces due to high water levels the lake has an excess amount of debris. This can create hazards on the lake as well as make some areas difficult to maneuver. This debris can also fluctuate and move throughout the day with wind patterns. Clarence Cannon Dam will also be near or at maximum release, utilizing tainter gates to release water, please take extra caution to stay away from the Dam. We ask that you stay aware while on the lake, avoid areas you may see with large amounts of debris, and wear a life jacket while on the water.
  • Temporary Closure of the National Great Rivers Museum and Illinois Esplanade

    The US Army Corps of Engineers, Rivers Project Office, will temporarily close the National Great Rivers Museum and Illinois Esplanade area including the picnic shelter to all pedestrians, fishermen and vehicle traffic on Friday, May 31, 2019 at 7 p.m. due to rising water levels.
  • Carlyle Lake Pool Update - May 23, 2019

    CARLYLE LAKE - As of 1:00 p.m. on Thursday, 23 May 2019 the pool elevation at Carlyle Lake was 446.63 feet, referenced to the National Geodetic Vertical Datum (NGVD). The current release rate is   approximately 4,040 cubic feet per second (cfs). The inflow for Wednesday, 22 May 2019 was approximately 12,790 day second feet (dsf). With current precipitation on the ground, Carlyle Lake is forecasted to crest at 449.5 feet NGVD on Tuesday, 28 May 2019. Carlyle Lake Dam is operating as designed, helping reduce flood stages on the Lower Kaskaskia and Mississippi Rivers. 
  • Coast Guard, Army Corps of Engineers coordinate transit of vessel through water closure zone

    ST. LOUIS – The Coast Guard and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers coordinated the safe transit of a vessel, scheduled to provide emergency support for flood damage, through a high water closure zone in the St. Louis Harbor, Friday.
  • High Water in the Mississippi River Valley

    VICKSBURG, Miss. – Protecting people, infrastructure, commerce, agriculture and energy are always at the forefront of what we do at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mississippi Valley Division (MVD). National Weather Service (NWS) analyses show a high pressure area located near the Southeast coast of the United States and a large trough out west. “This is the same pattern seen in most of the significant flooding events in the Mississippi Valley over the past 120 years, including the high water experienced earlier this year,” said Bill Frederick, senior NWS meteorologist and NWS liaison at the Mississippi Valley Division. NWS model guidance suggests this pattern will continue through at least the middle of May and will produce areas of very heavy rains across the Mississippi watershed. Currently, models show the heaviest rains falling over the Arkansas/Red/White/lower Missouri/middle Mississippi/Illinois valleys.
  • Corps of Engineers activates Emergency Operations Center

    St. Louis District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, activated its Emergency Operations Center as part of its continued readiness posture and response to rising forecasted river stages. The EOC will operate seven days a week from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.